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Text Alternative: Healthy Native Babies Project: Safe Sleep Train-The-Trainer Module 5 of 6

To view the original video, please go to http://www.nichd.nih.gov/sts/news/videos/healthynative/Pages/default.aspx

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Healthy Native Babies Project
logo.

Healthy Native Babies Project
:
Honoring the Past, Learning for the Future


A Collaboration Between the Healthy Native Babies Project Workgroup and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH)

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services logo.

NIH Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development logo.
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Trainers


Photo: Leah Henry-Tanner

Leah Henry-Tanner, BS
Nez Perce Tribe of Idaho

Photo: Geradine Simkins

Geradine Simkins
RN, CNM, MSN
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Safe Sleep Train-The-Trainer


Training Location:
Yakama Nation Cultural Heritage Center
Toppenish, WA
August 7, 2014
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Understanding the Messages Activity Overview


Workstations:
  • Learn how to put information into action:
    • Safe Sleep Environment
    • Safe Sleep Messages
    • Risk Continuum
    • Slide Set 1
    • Slide Set 2                                                       
Photo of father putting his baby in crib and mother sitting in the background holding a baby.  

(The camera cuts back and forth between Geradine Simkins, Leah Henry-Tanner, and the participants at the Safe Sleep Environment workstation. The workstation has a play yard, doll, blanket, pacifier, pillow, bottle, and toys.)
Geradine Simkins: This first workstation is called the Safe Sleep Environment station. And what we're doing is having a simulated sleep environment where we have a baby, and we have a pillow, and we have a blanket, and we have a few items here that are with the baby. And so, our goal is to determine what is a safe environment, and what's not a safe environment.

But in order to do that, remember we were talking earlier about the fact that we were going to give you some ideas of ways to talk about this with clients and people that you encounter? How we're going to work that is we're going to look at some scenarios here, and the scenario is going to tell us what we're going to talk about with this sleep environment. So, for example, say group number one is here, and you've got your four people here. Then, one person at a time will take their paper, and they will read it.

Participant: You have a table at a pow wow. Show us how you can use this activity in that setting.

Geradine Simkins: OK, so she reads it in group number one. The first person reads it, and so it is her job then to pretend that she is at a pow wow. It’s a health exhibit at a pow wow. And so, she's going to talk about what it is that would make for a safe sleep environment.

One of the things that we like to do is we like to set up the environment and just say to the people who gather around us, "So, what's not right about this environment? What do you notice that might not be the safest?"

So, as the person whose task this is to do this scenario, you may want to do that. You may want to say "This is what it looks like. Is this good? Would you change anything about it?"

And then the people in the group with her are going to change what would be the items that wouldn't be in a safe sleep environment.

And then the next person is going to take the next scenario and going to read it, and then she's going to do it, and on and on...[laughter].
Participant picks the baby doll up out of the play yard and comforts it while speaking with Other Participant. Participant: So, if I was a new mom bringing my baby home, I would try to comfort the baby and pick her up. Try to soothe her. I would clean out her bed, because those–do you sleep with things in your bed?

Other Participant:
Yes.

Participant:
You do sleep with bottles and pacifiers in your bed?

Other Participant:
Yes, two of them.
While holding the baby doll, Participant takes everything else out of the play yard and then lays the doll back in the play yard, with the doll on its back. Participant: I don't think the baby would think that was very comfortable. I'm going to try to clear that out. And, babies don't really need pillows as they sleep. They don't need that support on their backs. So, I would just try to calm my baby, get her to stop crying. Maybe burp her. Maybe she has a tummy ache. I would wrap my baby; I would have her in some warm pajamas. Try to soothe her and just lay her flat on her back in her bed after she's asleep. And, you would be surprised at how much better she's going to sleep.

Other Participant: OK.
(The camera cuts back and forth between Geradine Simkins, as she addresses the participants, and the doll in the play yard.) Geradine Simkins: And so the idea is to be able to begin to talk about it. You know? And, pretend like, for example, so she's the health educator at the pow wow. She's showing three of you gals–say you're teenage gals–walk up to the table, and you're going "Oh, a baby! Oh, isn't that cool?" You know, "What are you doing here?"

And then she says, "Well, here's what we're doing here." Then the three of you begin to ask questions. Act as if you are the teenagers that walk up, so that you can be having an interaction, so that some of the questions that might come up in a real situation you can begin to discuss with one another. But also, in addition, on your table will be the key points for Safe Sleep Environment workstation, i.e., the play yard. And so, each of you will get one of these papers, and these are yours to take with you.

And so, as you begin the little exercise, you might just want to read this over. Get an idea of what it is that you're talking about here. Or you might not want to read it over, and you might just leave that until the end. And then after you do your exercise, for about 15 to 18 minutes per station, then afterwards, together you might want to review this, and say, "How'd we do?" You know, and then you as the leader in this case might be reading this and say, "Well... this is how you did."
GRAPHICS SLIDE:

Understanding the Messages Activity Overview


Workstations:
  • Learn how to put information into action:
    • Safe Sleep Environment
    • Safe Sleep Messages
    • Risk Continuum
    • Slide Set 1
    • Slide Set 2    
 

Photo of father putting his baby in crib and mother sitting in the background holding a baby.

(Here, the camera cuts back and forth between Geradine Simkins, and the participants at the Safe Sleep Message workstation. The workstation has a small flipchart that shows a picture on the front with a question and on the back of the card has the answers.)
Geradine Simkins: So, this is called the Safe Sleep Message station. This is an item that was produced, actually it was produced in Michigan by one of the Healthy Start nurses that was in the project that I was working with, and it is very low technology and very easy to do. And as a matter of fact, you can get copies of these pages and have them laminated just like this. Punch the hole, and voilà, you're ready to go. So, this is a really good tool to take into homes, for those of you who are doing home visits, or even small clinics. This is a really, really, slick, quick, easy situation here.

So, this is just a simple Q&A. How do you make sleep safer for babies? So, again, we have the scenarios again. So, the first person will take out her scenario, will read the story. And it might say you are teaching a teen pregnancy class, let's just say that's the scenario. So, she sits with her gals, and she says, "How do you make sleep safer for babies?" And the other three in the group give her answers, you know, come up with answers.

And then after you've exhausted some of the answers, on the back is "A) By providing a safe sleep environment that addresses these issues: Sleep position, sleep location, sleep surface, sleep area, sleep temperature."

Lead Participant:
OK, question five. "Why should the baby's sleep area be in the same room where others sleep?"

Other Participant: The baby has a bond with its mom.

Lead Participant:
Bonding.

Unseen Participant: So you can be attentive to the child.

Lead Participant: Be attentive.

Unseen Participant:
Be easier for her to breastfeed and put the baby back in its own bed.

Geradine Simkins:
Pretty simple, straightforward. The idea of this particular one, for me, is that it's not wordy. It's not complicated. It's just pretty straightforward. You know? How do you make it safer? By these things. OK? So, what we're going to do again, is when we rotate after about 15 or 20 minutes, then you decide who goes first again. Take your scenario, sit in a circle or stand around, however you want to do it, and this is what you'll work with. OK? And, I think there's somewhere in the range of a dozen pages or so.
GRAPHICS SLIDE:

Understanding the Messages Activity Overview


Workstations:
  • Learn how to put information into action:
    • Safe Sleep Environment
    • Safe Sleep Messages
    • Risk Continuum
    • Slide Set 1
    • Slide Set 2    
          Photo of father putting his baby in crib and mother sitting in the background holding a baby.  

(For this section, the camera cuts back and forth between Geradine Simkins, photos of participants using the Risk Continuum Chart, and the participants at the Risk Continuum workstation. The Risk Continuum Chart is a poster with a line running horizontal down the center with “high risk” at one end and “low risk” at the other end.)
Geradine Simkins: This tends to be one of the most interactive stations because we're talking about the continuum. Now, you probably remember when we began the whole session here, we talked about the idea of risk reduction. Right? Reducing the risk of infant death. And what things reduce risk, and what things increase risk. And on this continuum, you're going to place these little cards. They have velcro on the back, and there's velcro strips up there, and so... "Baby placed to sleep on its back, dressed in sleep clothing." Where do you think this might go?

Participants:
Reduced risk.

Geradine Simkins: Reduced risk? OK. And then you decide if it goes all the way over this way or heading towards neutral or what? And, we'll just put it there for now. So you put that up there. And the really interesting thing about this one is you have a conversation. You may think it goes here, but you may think it goes here.

Then you have a conversation about why. You are already dealing with a clientele that is at-risk. So, they already get some points for being at-risk. So, take that into consideration. When LaShauna gives an answer, she might think something goes here, in the reducing risk, or let me say–Natasha might think it goes here, but you might think it goes there, because you–so talk about that, and help each other understand this whole thing about continuum.  

Because, this is the place where we try to help our clients understand that they're smart, they care about their babies, they want their babies to live. But, what's the best way to reduce risk so that the babies don't die accidentally?

Participant: So, let's talk about the dangers of having you as the parent and the child with your other children in the bed.

Other Participants:
Yeah I see that. Yeah.

Participant:
You have the risk of other children move, other children kick, and having a new baby in the bed. Well, that's just not safe.

Other Participants:
Right. Mmm hmm.

Participant: And then having the family dog in there as well.

Other Participant:
In the same bed, yeah.

Participant:
You're leading to the dog possibly suffocating the child.

Geradine Simkins: And you don't have to use all of these pictures, because there's some that are redundant. In fact, at the beginning you might even want to pick out a few, and say these are the ones we really want to work with. And once again, you've got some risk continuum scenarios. But frankly I think just working with these cards and this chart, right off the bat, even without getting into the scenarios right off the bat, is a really good way to begin the conversations. And hopefully, you'll get into some of those conversations like, "Well, grandma smokes and we live with grandma, and she's the elder. We know that smoking is not healthy for our baby, but she is dedicated to her smoking; and she loves us too. What do we do?"
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Safe Sleep Train-The-Trainer

This Concludes Module 5 of 6

For more information and materials about SIDS, reducing SIDS risk, or the Healthy Native Babies Project, contact the Safe to Sleep®campaign at:  1-800-505-CRIB (2742) or http://safetosleep.nichd.nih.gov
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